Category Archives: Life as a Creative

On Having Game Design Rationales in the Text

Let’s talk today about having game design rationales embedded in game texts. Some of the work I do as a technical writer is communications writing, like emails to customers about upcoming changes or actions they need to take. And some of you cringe at the thought because you know how low a success rate those

Working on Your Game for Years is Okay

I saw a really good comment about my piece on ambition being the enemy of good last week, from someone who saw my post as disheartening because they’ve been working on their game for years, and that perhaps they should just give up because of what I said. That’s a very fair criticism of my

Your Game Will Suck & That’s Okay

A friend with impostor syndrome and a rather successful Kickstarter asked me a question a few weeks ago: What if my game sucks? I didn’t give them a soft bunny answer: It will. To unpack that in its various dimensions: Your game will suck to you. It’ll suck to you in ways where you feel you need

Ambition is the Enemy of Good & Done

You may have heard adages like “perfect is the enemy of good” and “perfect is the enemy of done.” But where does the drive to be “perfect” come from? I don’t think those sayings are particularly useful unless you think about the motivations behind them. Enter ambition, stage left. — Neophyte game designers often have ambition

Make Ambition Sheets after Conferences

I just got back from the Write the Docs 2016 conference in Portland, and the conference was nothing short of amazing. It filled with with so many ideas for my organization, my professional development, and my personal projects. Something I realized I should do last night, after laying down and being unable to sleep because

How I Got Better at Replying to Email

I used to be really horrible about replying to people. This was linked with my anxiety—I’d get an email I didn’t know how to deal with, and I’d just sit on it until I thought I could give some good news. Turns out that others found my lack of response more nerve-wracking than getting a disappointed